History of Technology

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Upcoming Meetings

There are no currently scheduled upcoming events.


Past Meetings

  • December 17, 2019

    Paulina Hartono, Berkeley, "Do Radios Have Politics? The Politics of Radio Ownership in China in the 1920s and 1930s"


  • November 19, 2019

    Jaipreet Virdi, University of Delaware, "Dorothy Brett's 'Ear Machines': Disability, Technology and Representation"


  • October 15, 2019

    Tech Working Group will not meet on October 15, due to the upcoming international SHOT conference


  • September 17, 2019

    What is the history of technology and who gets to decide?
    The group will discuss Eric Schatzberg's conclusion and manifesto from his Technology: Critical History of a Concept, and Jennifer Lieberman's essay "Finding a Place for Technology."


  • April 16, 2019

    Benjamin Twagira, Emory University, paper title "'We Are What What We Know': Radio, Rumor, Identity and Politics in Militarized Kampala"


  • March 19, 2019

    Meredith Sattler, Cal Poly San Louis Obispo, "Knowledge Space Eco-Technics:  Designing Life-Forms and Life Ways at Biosphere 2, 1974-1994"


  • February 19, 2019

    Whitney Laemmli, Columbia University Society of Fellows in the Humanities, "The Lilt in Labour: Movement, Efficiency, and Pleasure in Mid-Century British Industry"


  • January 15, 2019

    James Esposito, Ohio State University, "The Airplane as Breathing Machine: Aviation Medicine and Human Experimentation at the Royal Air Force Physiological Laboratory 1939-1954"


  • November 20, 2018

    We will be reading Lee Vinsel and Andy Russell's Technology and Culture article "After Innovation, Turn to Maintenance."  Jennifer Alexander will share some thoughts to share some thoughts to start the conversation.


  • October 16, 2018

    Peter Sachs Collopy, Caltech Archives, "When Computer Animation was Analog: Scanimation Outside the Digital Paradigm"


Group Conveners

  • jalexander's picture

    Jennifer Alexander

    Jennifer Alexander is an Associate Professor of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine at the University of Minnesota, with specialization in technology and religion; industrial culture; and engineering, ethics, and society.  Her publications include The Mantra of Efficiency: From Waterwheel to Social Control (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008). Her current project is a book manuscript analyzing the international religious critique of technology that developed following WWII.  She asks how religious and theological interpretations of technology have changed over time; how, over time, technologies and engineering have extended their reach into the human world over time through a developing technological orthodoxy; and how these changes have affected each other.

     

  • grossbLHL's picture

    Benjamin Gross

    Benjamin Gross is Vice President for Research and Scholarship at the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, Missouri. He is responsible for managing the Library’s scholarly outreach initiatives, including its fellowship program. Before relocating to the Midwest in 2016, he was a research fellow at the Science History Institute and consulting curator of the Sarnoff Collection at the College of New Jersey. His book, The TVs of Tomorrow: How RCA’s Flat-Screen Dreams Led to the First LCDs, was published in 2018 by the University of Chicago Press.

     

     

  • zmmann's picture

    Zachary Mann

    Zachary M. Mann is a Consortium Research Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate in Literature at the University of Southern California. Currently he is also a Mellon-Council for European Studies fellow. Previously he was a Mellon Humanities in a Digital World fellow and a Ransom Center fellow. His work focuses on the intersections of literature, media, and histories of technology, and his dissertation traces the co-evolutions of punch card technology and conceptions of authorship from the eighteenth century to today.

     

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